Atheist Billboards

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 Sep 

Moscow, ID

Idaho

Millions are good without God.

 
 
PRESS RELEASE

“Millions are Good Without God,” Moscow, ID Billboard Declares

“Millions are Good Without God,” said the American Humanist Association (AHA) on a new billboard put up in Moscow, Idaho yesterday. The billboard is one of several that have gone up in the Moscow area, part of an advertising campaign to spread awareness about being good without God. An image of the display can be found here.

“We want people to know that you can be good without God,” said Roy Speckhardt, executive director of the American Humanist Association. “Too many think that morality is the exclusive domain of the religious—we’re here to prove that assumption wrong.”

“We also want to reach out to other nontheists to let them know there is a community out there for them and that they’re not alone,” said Speckhardt.

The billboard will run on Highway 95, just south of Moscow near the Sweet Avenue cross street, facing northbound traffic. It will be displayed through January.

The “Millions are Good Without God” ad is the third billboard to appear in the Moscow area. This past spring the American Humanist Association ran an ad in the area that read “Don’t believe in God? You are not alone,” and in the fall the American Humanist Association ran an ad that said “Want a Better World? Prayer not Required.”

“We’ve had great success with this advertising campaign,” said Speckhardt. “We’ve heard from nontheists who have been very enthusiastic about it and are excited to be part of this community, and we’ve heard from theists who have voiced their support of us speaking out.”

“Even though we still have a long way to go to overcome prejudice against us, it’s becoming less controversial to say you don’t need to believe in God in order to be a good person,” concluded Speckhardt.

The American Humanist Association billboard campaign is part of a larger effort to spread awareness about nontheism. Other like-minded organizations such as the United Coalition of Reason have placed billboards in Phoenix, AZ; Philadelphia, PA and Charleston, SC. In addition, the AHA ran bus ads that read “Why Believe in a God? Just be Good for Goodness’ Sake” in Washington, D.C. during the 2008 winter holiday season.

[September 16, 2009]

 
VANDALISM
PRESS RELEASE

Humanist Billboard Vandalized in Moscow, Idaho
Washington, D.C -- Vandals have blacked out—apparently with spray paint—part of a billboard in Moscow, Idaho that reads "Millions are good without God" so that the word "without" is unreadable. The billboard, which was placed by the American Humanist Association in mid-September, is part of an AHA advertising campaign to spread awareness about being good without God. It's the third billboard the organization has displayed in the Moscow area and similar advertisements have been put up around the country. "We're disappointed that someone felt the need to sabotage our message," said Roy Speckhardt, executive director of the American Humanist Association. "We don't see the billboard as being controversial or an attack on religion; we see it as just stating a point of fact. It's saddening that some people react with such antagonism to the mere statement you can be good without a belief in God." "I knew there would be some disagreement with the billboard's slogan, but I do wish that those who objected would have opened a dialogue with us rather than trying to stifle our message and damaging property," continued Speckhardt. "A phone call would have been much nicer." The American Humanist Association has filed a police report with the Moscow Police Department. In addition, it has alerted the billboard company they contracted with, Lamar Outdoor, who said they will assess whether or not the billboard can be cleaned. If not, the American Humanist Association will pay to have the billboard replaced. "If we replace the billboard our next slogan might read 'Being good without God clearly not for everybody'," Speckhardt joked. The billboard can be found on Highway 95, just south of Moscow near the Sweet Avenue cross street, facing northbound traffic. Lamar Outdoor said that occasionally billboards are vandalized, but it hasn't happened in several years. This is the first American Humanist Association advertisement that has been defaced to the organization's knowledge. "We have had a few complaints about our advertisements, but most have been respectful of our right to speak our minds," said Speckhardt.
Humanist Billboard Vandalized in Moscow, Idaho...Again
An individual or individuals have defaced a billboard in Moscow, Idaho… again. The billboard originally read "Millions are good without God" but was partially obscured with blue paint to now read "Millions are good with God". It's the second time the American Humanist Association (AHA)-sponsored billboard has been vandalized in two weeks. In the first instance the word "without" was completely blacked out, after which the AHA quickly replaced the billboard. The advertisement, which was originally placed mid-September, is part of an American Humanist Association advertising campaign to spread awareness about being good without God. It's the third billboard advertisement the organization has displayed in the Moscow area and similar ads have been put up around the country. A picture of the vandalized billboard can be found here. The billboard can be found on Highway 95, just south of Moscow near the Sweet Avenue cross street, facing northbound traffic. "The irony here is worth noting," said David Niose, president of the American Humanist Association. "Some individuals are committing criminal acts while apparently claiming that their religious view of the world leads to good behavior. It's not a very convincing argument on their part." "This is not just vandalism, it is religiously motivated vandalism which attempts to silence a minority viewpoint," added Niose. "Everyone, not just humanists, should be concerned about such acts." The Moscow Police Department notified the AHA this morning. They believe the ad was defaced between 1 and 3 am. The AHA has alerted the billboard company who leased the space, Lamar Outdoor, who said they will start leaving the lights on round the clock. The AHA will be replacing the billboard but hasn't yet decided whether to go with the same design. "I'm disturbed that this happened again," said Roy Speckhardt, executive director of the American Humanist Association. "Two consecutive crimes in a town where the last incidence of billboard vandalism was years ago makes it obvious that humanists and our message are being targeted."
 
 

 Moscow, ID 

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